Adoption

Adoption Top

By adopting one of our whale sharks you will not only be contributing to whale shark research, but just as importantly, to their conservation.

For its conservation we:

  1. In 2006, in collaboration with the Mexican government, the rules for whale shark interactions were generated.
  2. Since 2009, and in collaboration with the Mexican government, we have been training the staff of the tourist companies to promote the rules.
  3. We placed billboards in marinas of La Paz city detailing the rules and during the monitoring we share this information with private boats by dissemination material.
  4. We have produced a video presentation of the rules and regulations for interacting and swimming with the whale sharks in the Bay of La Paz.
  5. In 2014 we were part of the National Reunion for the Conservation of Whale Sharks in Mexican waters. This meeting was part of the conservation program of species at risk (Programa de conservation de especies en riesgo PROCER) with the objective of updating the whale shark data at national level, to discuss the problematic issues around the tourist activity and to generate the Program of Action for the Conservation of this Species (Programa de Acción para la Conservación de la Especie PACE).
  6. Every year we hold public presentations regarding the importance of conserving the whale shark and its habitat.
  7. With Panterra Educational and Cultural Training Society and with Ecology Project International we conducted research expeditions involving high school students. Besides the experience with the Whale Sharks, the students learned about the importance of research and conservation of these giants and their habitat!

Meet the Sharks

flavioFlavio

Is a juvenile whale shark who has been a seasonal resident in the Bay of La Paz. Our first data from Flavio is from November 22, 2004 when he measured 4.6 meters. Since that time he has grown almost 4 meters and now measures 9 meters.





Flavio - One time fee




tikitikiTikitiki

Is a juvenile whale shark who has been a seasonal resident in the Bay of La Paz. Our first data from Tikitiki is from December 21, 2006 when Tikitiki measured 4 meters. Since that time she has grown 3 meters and now measures 7 meters. On March 13 of 2010 we placed a satellite tag on Tikitiki. She moved to the North of the Sea of Cortez and she dove to 1300 m.





Tikitiki - One time fee




davidDavid

Is a juvenile whale shark who has been a seasonal resident in the Bay of La Paz. Our first data from David is from February 2, 2010 when he measured 5 meters. Since that time he has grown almost 2 meters and now measures 7 meters. David has shown movements between Los Angeles Bay and La Paz Bay.





David - One time fee




mauroMauro

Is a juvenile whale shark who has been a seasonal resident in the Bay of La Paz. Our first data from Mauro is from December 26, 2012 when he measured 5 meters. Since that time he has grown almost 1 meter and now measures 6 meters.





Mauro - One time fee




futuroFuturo

Is a juvenile shark who was seen at Isla Espiritu Santo in 2014 and the same year was seen in Bahia de Los Angeles. He is a 4 meter shark.





Futuro - One time fee




libertadLibertad

In November of 2012, a female was rescued from a net in the Archipelago of Revillagigedo and 6 months later we saw her in Los Cabos! We named her Libertad (freedom) and we were grateful to see her safe and pregnant! This is second evidence of connectivity between these two sites! Thanks to Erick Higuera for sharing photo-ID pictures from Libertad in Revillagigedo.





Libertad - One time fee